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Central Portfolio Control Lawsuit

Central Portfolio Control (CPC) is a third-party debt collection agency headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama. The company has been the subject of numerous lawsuits alleging violations of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA).

The FDCPA is a federal law that protects consumers from abusive and unfair debt collection practices. The law prohibits debt collectors from engaging in a variety of activities, including:

  • Using harassing or abusive language
  • Threatening to sue or arrest consumers
  • Contacting consumers at inconvenient times
  • Falsely representing themselves as law enforcement officers
  • Disclosing consumers’ debts to third parties

CPC has been accused of violating all of these provisions of the FDCPA. For example, in one lawsuit, CPC was accused of calling consumers multiple times per day, even after they had requested that the calls stop. In another lawsuit, CPC was accused of threatening to sue consumers who did not pay their debts immediately.

CPC has also been accused of violating the FDCPA by falsely representing itself as a law enforcement agency. In one case, CPC sent letters to consumers that stated that they were “law enforcement officers” and that they had the authority to arrest consumers if they did not pay their debts.

In addition, CPC has been accused of disclosing consumers’ debts to third parties without their consent. In one case, CPC sent letters to consumers’ employers and neighbors, informing them of the consumers’ debts.

CPC has denied all of the allegations against it. However, the company has settled several of the lawsuits filed against it.

FAQs:

  • What is the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA)?

The FDCPA is a federal law that protects consumers from abusive and unfair debt collection practices. The law prohibits debt collectors from engaging in a variety of activities, including:

* Using harassing or abusive language

* Threatening to sue or arrest consumers

* Contacting consumers at inconvenient times

* Falsely representing themselves as law enforcement officers

* Disclosing consumers’ debts to third parties

  • What are some examples of FDCPA violations?

Some examples of FDCPA violations include:

* Calling consumers multiple times per day, even after they have requested that the calls stop

* Threatening to sue consumers who do not pay their debts immediately

* Falsely representing themselves as law enforcement agencies

* Disclosing consumers’ debts to third parties without their consent

  • What should I do if I think a debt collector is violating the FDCPA?

If you think a debt collector is violating the FDCPA, you can file a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). You can also file a lawsuit against the debt collector in state or federal court.

  • What are the penalties for violating the FDCPA?

Debt collectors who violate the FDCPA can be sued by consumers for actual damages, emotional distress damages, and punitive damages. The CFPB can also fine debt collectors for violating the FDCPA.

  • How can I protect myself from FDCPA violations?

There are a few things you can do to protect yourself from FDCPA violations:

* Know your rights under the FDCPA. The CFPB has a website with information about the FDCPA and how to file a complaint.

* Keep a record of all communications with debt collectors. This can help you prove that a debt collector has violated the FDCPA.

* If you are being harassed by a debt collector, file a complaint with the CFPB.

  • What should I do if I am sued by a debt collector?

If you are sued by a debt collector, you should contact an attorney to discuss your legal options. You may have defenses to the lawsuit, such as the statute of limitations or the fact that the debt collector violated the FDCPA.

Conclusion

If you have been contacted by Central Portfolio Control, it is important to know your rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. If you believe that CPC is violating the FDCPA, you can file a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau or file a lawsuit against the company.

References:

  • Norton v. Central Portfolio Control Inc. et al., 2:18-cv-00787: https://www.classaction.org/media/norton-v-central-portfolio-control-inc-et-al.pdf
  • Immel v. Cent. Portfolio Control, Inc., Case No.11-cv-424-LA: https://www.classaction.org/media/norton-v-central-portfolio-control-inc-et-al.pdf
  • Brown v. Central Portfolio Control Inc et al 3:2023cv00526: https://www.classaction.org/media/norton-v-central-portfolio-control-inc-et-al.pdf

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